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Comparing our method side-by-side with other techniques.

There are a number of ways mosquito-borne diseases can be controlled. Find out more about how the World Mosquito Program's Wolbachia method compares to other mosquito control methods being used around the world.

Jump to the comparison table further below to compare our method side-by-side with other methods.

 

World Mosquito Program Wolbachia Method

Our method uses Wolbachia-carrying mosquitoes to naturally prevent the transmission of mosquito-borne diseases, including dengue, Zika, chikungunya and yellow fever. We release both female and male mosquitoes each week for several months, which facilitates the establishment of Wolbachia into the Aedes aegypti mosquito population. Since Wolbachia-carrying mosquitoes can’t transmit diseases, the incidence of mosquito-borne diseases reduces or is eliminated in areas where Wolbachia is established at high levels.

Sustainability Number of mosquitoes released Effectiveness Length of mosquito-release period Scaleability Affordability Evidence of public health impact Safety GMO status Where it's used
World Mosquito Program Wolbachia Method Self-sustaining Only need to release a small number of mosquitoes Usually only need to release mosquitoes once Short mosquito-release period (once per week for 12–30 weeks) Has been demonstrated at the scale of hundreds of kms² Affordable (we are working towards a cost of less than US$1 per person). In most urban areas predicted to be cost saving Multi-country evidence indicating major reductions in dengue incidence Safe for human health Non-GMO Currently in 10 countries
Insecticide spraying Not self-sustaining N/A Need to constantly reapply insecticides. Mosquitoes develop resistance to insecticides. Not cost-effective to use as a prevention tool N/A Can be used at the scale of towns and cities Expensive because of need for continuous application No randomised control trials showing evidence of impact Insecticides can harm human health Non-GMO Used in most countries with mosquito-borne diseases
Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) Not self-sustaining Need to release a very large number of male mosquitoes Need to continually release large amounts of mosquitoes Mosquito-release period is indefinite otherwise population will rebound No published evidence of scaleability Relatively more expensive because of need for continuous application No evidence on whether it reduces disease transmission Safe for human health Non-GMO Currently piloted in five countries
Incompatible Insect Technique (IIT) Not self-sustaining Need to release a very large number of male mosquitoes Need to continually release large amounts of mosquitoes Mosquito-release period is indefinite otherwise population will rebound Demonstrated to work in areas up to several square kilometres Relatively more expensive because of need for continuous application No evidence on whether it reduces disease transmission Safe for human health Non-GMO Successfully trialled in French Polynesia
Combined SIT & IIT Not self-sustaining Need to release a very large number of male mosquitoes Need to continually release large amounts of mosquitoes Mosquito-release period is indefinite otherwise population will rebound Demonstrated to work in areas up to several square kilometres Relatively more expensive because of need for continuous application No evidence on whether it reduces disease transmission Safe for human health Non-GMO Currently being trialled in China and Thailand
Genetic modification Not self-sustaining Numbers of mosquitoes released depends on the specific method Numbers of mosquitoes released depends on the specific method In some cases, mosquito-release period is indefinite otherwise population will rebound Demonstrated to work in areas up to several square kilometres Often more expensive because of need for continuous application No evidence on whether it reduces disease transmission Safe for human health GMO Currently being used in Brazil